What is a Motorcycle Engine Number?

You might see the unique identification number engraved on your motorbike engine. Have you wondered what this number is?

The unique nine-digit identification number engraved on your motorbike engine is called a motorbike engine number.  

Don’t worry! This post will discuss what a motorcycle engine number is and why the manufacturer engraved the nine-digit number on your motorcycle engine. 

What is a Motorcycle Engine Number?

The motorcycle engine number is the nine-digit unique identification number that the manufacturer engraved on your motorcycle. And they do this to identify the motorbike model. 

Unlink the unique VIN; you can find the motorcycle engine number precisely engraved on the motorbike engine number only.

Why Motorcycle Engine Number?

So far, you understand what motorcycle engine number is, but have you wondered what the role of motorcycle engine number is? 

The motorcycle engine number is the unique nine-digit identification number that helps the manufacturers identify the model and processing line from where your motorbike was manufactured. 

It also helps to tell whether your motorbike was modified earlier by a third party or not. 

What if there’s no Motorcycle Engine Number?

So far, you understand why your motorcycle engine number is crucial but have you wondered what happens if there’s no motorbike engine number.

The absence of a motorcycle engine number directly means that your motorbike was modified earlier by a thief party illegally. And when we see them illegally, this means they harmed your motorbike engine. 

You will always find motorcycle engine numbers engraved on the engine if you’re buying a motorcycle directly from the manufacturer or dealer. But there’s a higher chance that you won’t find any engine number if you’re buying a used motorbike. 

We’re not saying buying a used motorbike is terrible, but we’re saying that you should check the motorbike engine number engraved on the engine before concluding the deal.

And if there’s no motorbike engine number, then you should not consider buying it. 

Why is a Motorcycle Engine Running Rich if there’s no Engine Number?

Many riders who bought used motorbikes without engine numbers experience their engine running rich. Let’s find out what would be the reason why the engine is running rich. 

Jet Is Too Large:

If the jet is too large, it will hold more fuel, resulting in more fuel consumption. This is what will lead to your engine running rich.

High Float Level:

The float is what controls how much fuel gets into the jet. If the float level is too high, the jet could overfill.

Absence of Crucial Part:

The absence of a motorbike engine number is the direct meaning that there could be missing crucial parts. In the case of the absence of a crucial part then you should take your motorbike to the technician and see what you can do about it. 

Stuck Choke:

How much air is getting into the fuel? If you have a working choke valve, it will decide that for you. However, if the choke is stuck, then too much air may be getting into the fuel. The choke can get stuck or remain open when you’re turning the handlebars.

Stuck Float:

A stuck float will result in too much fuel entering the jet and getting into the venturi. If your airbox has a bit of fuel in it, then you will know your float is stuck. Similarly, afloat with a standard petcock will also result in the same thing. However, this time, the fuel will overflow even when the bike is idle.

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Ways to Fix A Motorcycle Engine Running Rich:

If your motorbike engine is running rich then it doesn’t mean that you should buy a new motorbike. 

We always believe in saving money, so here are some ways through which you can fix your motorbike running rich.  

1. Adjust the Air/Fuel Screw:

If you suspect your motorcycle is running rich, the first thing to check is the fuel screw. Now, it’s a bit tricky since every manufacturer calls it by a different name. Fuel screw, air-to-fuel screw, idle screw – you get the gist. But you can easily locate it on your carburetor.

Fixing the screw isn’t easy, however. That’s because each bike has a different procedure. Have a look at the manufacturer’s manual to find out how to tighten the screw to the right position. No, it won’t be as easy as simply screwing it down. In some cases, you may need to screw it out several times before setting it back in.

2. Fix Stuck Floats:

An engine float works like the float in your toilet. It allows a certain amount of fuel to flow through. However, if the float is stuck in the open position, it will overfill the jet and cause your engine to run rich.

First, you need to access the floats. Find the 3-4 screws near the bottom of the carburetor bowl and unscrew them. Then lift the bowl up to find the floats inside. Before you proceed, it’s a good idea to memorize where the floats were before you meddle with them. Or perhaps take a picture.

Push the pin sticking out of the float such that the float falls free. Next, spray the carburetor cleaner inside the carburetor bowl. Also, clean the floats themselves and the little stoppers on them, along with the carburetor’s hoses where they get seated.

Then, put everything back together and give your bike a test ride.

3. Clean Out the Air Filter:

The next most obvious solution is to clean out the air filter. If the filter gets clogged with dirt and debris, it will restrict airflow and lead to a rich engine.

The thing is, it’s not that easy to clean the air filter. While superficial dirt can be readily washed off, dirt stuck inside the little foam pockets will be harder to remove.

It would be much easier to buy a new filter. They don’t cost a lot. And they’ll work much better than your old filter.

4. Replace the Oxygen Sensor:

If you have a newer bike that is fuel-injected, then ignore everything we just said. Your problem is entirely different from what we discussed. In most cases, your oxygen sensor will be the problem.

Oxygen sensors degrade over time and quite rapidly since they’re so close to the combustion chambers. In this case, there isn’t much you can do other than replace them. You can do this yourself by following the manufactures’ guidelines or hire a professional for it.

5. Fix Stuck Butterfly Valves:

Butterfly valves are those small disc-shaped valves that open and close when you throttle your bike. These are what control the flow of fuel into and out of the carburetor. If the valve is left permanently open (mainly due to a broken spring), you have a rich engine.

The only way to test this is to look at the valves and see if they open and close properly as you twist the throttle. Remember to do this only when the engine is turned off. Remove the air filter and peer through the ports. If the valve doesn’t open and closes at the same rate as you’re twisting the throttle, then you need to replace it.

6. Sticking Needle:

The needle is a slim needle-like object that moves up and down as you turn the throttle on your bike. It lifts up and down to allow for more or less airflow respectively as you throttle your bike. Many factors can cause your needle to get perpetually stuck in the open position, such as an idle bike or a dirty carburetor.

Remove the air filter from the carburetor and locate the needle. Turn the engine off and twist the throttle. If the needle isn’t moving usually, then you have a problem. Clean the carburetor and the needle thoroughly before setting everything back into place.

© streetbiker-mag.com – Free to share with attribution and backlink. Thank you!

Frequently Asked Questions:

What is the motorcycle engine number?

The unique nine-digit identification number engraved on your motorbike engine is called a motorbike engine number.  

What is the role of motorcycle engine number?

The motorcycle engine number is the unique nine-digit identification number that helps the manufacturers identify the model and processing line from where your motorbike was manufactured. 

What will happens if there’s no motorcycle engine number?

The absence of a motorcycle engine number directly means that your motorbike was modified earlier by a thief party illegally. And when we see them illegally, this means they harmed your motorbike engine. 

Why is your motorbike running rich if there’s no engine number?

The absence of a motorbike engine number is the direct meaning that there could be missing crucial parts. In the case of the absence of a crucial part then you should take your motorbike to the technician and see what you can do about it. 

How stuck choke makes your motorbike running rich?

How much air is getting into the fuel? If you have a working choke valve, it will decide that for you. However, if the choke is stuck, then too much air may be getting into the fuel. The choke can get stuck or remain open when you’re turning the handlebars.

Our Verdict: 

What is a motorcycle engine number? The motorcycle engine number is the nine-digit unique identification number that the manufacturer engraved on your motorcycle. And they do this to identify the motorbike model. 

Unlink the unique VIN; you can find the motorcycle engine number precisely engraved on the motorbike engine number only.

We’ve also mentioned why some motorbike engines run rich if the engine number is not embedded. 

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